Which states have been hit hardest by unemployment in the last decade?

Posted by on Jan 10, 2010 in Blog, CAR, class, data visualizations | One Comment

I matched up the unemployment rates for each state in November 2009 with the unemployment rates from Nov. 1999, that is, the same measurements from a decade prior. Then, I calculated the absolute change of the unemployment rate, to see which states have been hit the hardest, looking at the quantity of citizens they are able to keep employed.

Data set here, culled from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Reflections on Visualization Theory (Data viz readings, week 1)

In this first set of reading, I learn that the principles of simplicity, accuracy and more are as true in data visualization as they are in a text story. Edward Tufte, Visual Explanations, “Images and Quantities” In Tufte’s first paragraph of Visual Explanations, he discusses the importance of readability — a concept I see as […]

My new perspective on math – it’s a journalistic tool!

Posted by on Jan 4, 2010 in Blog, class | No Comments

Tomorrow, Jan. 4, means the beginning of an end to my formal graduate education. It’s the first day of my final quarter at Medill. I’ll be returning to the Evanston campus for the first time since June 2009, primarily for an independent study on data visualization with Medill professor Rich Gordon. I’ll also be taking […]

Changes in how we travel across U.S. borders

Posted by on Dec 30, 2009 in Blog, data visualizations, projects | No Comments

Traveling is something we often take for granted nowadays — at least, I know I do.  And as situations in my life have changed, I’ve been thinking about all the different types of transportation I use.  I’m a bit more reliant on my car in the Chicago suburbs, and while I griped about the Metro […]

The limitations of SQL and Access

Posted by on Nov 25, 2009 in Blog, CAR | No Comments

Quick tips on how SQL and Access differ in nuances associated with CAR. I speak from the experience Team Data and I have had this week on our CAR project over at Medill.

A letter to journo-programmers: Teach me, inspire me

Posted by on Nov 24, 2009 in Blog, education, programming, theory | 5 Comments

St. Petersburg Times senior news technologist, and Politifact developer, Matt Waite: “If you could take a class from a journalist/programmer, what would you want out of it? I give my take based on my experience in Derek Willis’ CAR class.

Printies and webbies — we’re all journalists!

Posted by on Nov 22, 2009 in Blog, convergence, web | One Comment

As a student, I thought if I could just get the digital skills down, my journo-tech obsession would have a place in this world. Turns out, it might be far from that simple.

State of Healthcare Journalism

Posted by on Apr 5, 2009 in Blog, health, writing | No Comments

In mid-March, the Kaiser Family Foundation released a study on the state of healthcare journalism in the U.S.  As a budding journalist with a relatively new interest in the field, my self-recognized lack of years of experience is temepred by a completely unbridled passion and enthusiasm.  So delving into the pages I go, to figure […]

NYTimes Global Edition — do people care? Should they?

Posted by on Apr 5, 2009 in Blog, convergence, theory, web | No Comments

I recently returned from my spring break trip to Paris. Besides my obligatory Eiffel Tower at sunset trips, eating copious amounts of escargots and pain au chocolat — not together, obviously — the other reason I was there was for an international media seminar trip with Northwestern. Meeting with foreign correspondents, online journalists, authors and […]

“You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, Michelle”

Posted by on Feb 8, 2009 in Blog, theory, web, writing | No Comments

As some of you may know, my reporting beat at Medill right now is medical research.  One of my recent struggles has been fulfilling my class’ requirements for taking pictures, which is tough to do when dealing with large Chicago hospitals.  Perseverance can get you to speak to the chief of surgery, but it’s very […]